“The show’s great insight, the scientific imagination turned in on itself, and created a sworn enemy: science fiction.” Read on for the verdict on last night’s TV.

Mad and Bad: 60 Years of Science on TV, BBC4

“It was a self-referential history of television told through its science programmes.”
Andrew Billen, The Times

From an entertainment point of view, science on television has taken one giant leap backwards.”
Sam Wollaston, The Guardian

“The show’s great insight, the scientific imagination turned in on itself, and created a sworn enemy: science fiction.”
Amol Rajan, The Independent

“Put together mainly for the kicks and topped off with an ironic voiceover from Robert “Peep Show” Webb, this lengthy compliation nevertheless pointed up a couple of intriguing themes.”
Matt Baylis, The Express

“It was the interview episode, the one in which Lord Sugar’s most trusted Torquemadas audition for jobs in Abu Ghraib by grilling the remaining contestants to death.”
Andrew Billen, The Times

“I enjoy the interview round; it’s a bit different to the tasks, which have become a bit samey and could use a few fresh ideas. Here the candidates are properly put on the spot; not that they are given much of a chance to speak for themselves.”
Sam Wollaston, The Guardian

“Dear little Stuart, the 21-year-old whizz kid with more wacky ideas than facial hairs, was summarily dismissed on the grounds that he was “full of shit”…  This was done too harshly, and for the first time in several episodes there was a sense of injustice and unwarranted aggression.”
Amol Rajan, The Independent

Ugly Betty, E4

“She’s in London, is that it? Yes she is, for a BNP rally by the looks of it, judging by the number of Union flags about the place.”
Sam Wollaston, The Guardian

“It proved there’s nothing quite so effective or informative as showing the audience just an average day.”
Matt Baylis, The Express

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