The cost of services is inhibiting broadband uptake according to survey by PriceWaterhousecoopers, writes David Wood.

With the notably exception of Germany, where half of users have ISDN lines and cable modems,

The cost of services is inhibiting broadband uptake according to survey by PriceWaterhousecoopers, writes David Wood.

With the notably exception of Germany, where half of users have ISDN lines and cable modems, few who are aware of broadband access use it, says the report published this week. Only 12 per cent of UK users, 14 per cent of American, 20 per cent of French and 3 per cent of Australians have signed up to broadband because they are satisfied with their existing analogue connections revealed the survey of 2,500 internet users across the five countries.

PricewaterhouseCoopers entertainment and media practice leader, Europe Robert Boyle said: 'The industry needs to show consumers that broadband's benefits outweigh its costs. To spur adoption broadband providers need aggressive marketing to change the way their customers perceive this technology.'

The survey also showed that users still see the internet a communication and information aid rather than as an entertainment medium. Nine out of ten used the web for research or sending emails rather than entertainment.

When asked for their primary reasons for going online only 4 per cent of Europeans and 6 per cent of Americans said that entertainment came top.

PricewaterhouseCoopers entertainment and media specialist Kevin Carton said: 'The internet still has a primary purpose for consumers to help them get things done. In order to make it a viable source for entertainment, broadband access must increase in hand with more compelling content.'

With the exception of Germany most domestic consumers access the internet via analog phone lines (97 per cent in Australia, 87 per cent in the UK, 85 per cent in the US and 84 per cent in France. In Germany 48 per cent accessed the internet with a broadband connection - ISDN dominated with 38 per cent.